What do We value most in this world?



What do We value most in this world?

Our list:
Exploring one’s inner self.
Building a strong, conscious, honest relationship with oneself.
Being willing to look at painful or ugly sides of oneself.
Having courage; that is, taking action in spite of one’s own fears.
Being willing to admit errors and then struggling to change them.
Exercising one’s ability to view things from different perspectives.
Taking radical distance from one’s family of origin.
Being financially independent.
Respecting others’ true selves.
Experimenting, including engaging in healthy risk-taking.
Being confident enough to live in the flux of insecurity.
Having strong sexual boundaries.
Loving nature, wilderness, wildlife, and the non-human natural world.
Having broad-ranging intellectual curiosity.
Making sacrifices to achieve an important goal.
Taking a public stand.
Living a healthy physical life, including eating well, keeping appropriately active, and getting a good night’s sleep.
Loving children.
Recognizing the insanity in people having children before they have healed their own traumas.
Having fun.

And now we will repeat the items on our list, and follow each with an exploration of the corresponding opposite value, that is, the things we do not value:





Exploring one’s inner self. [Opposite value: Fear of looking within, living externally.]
Building a strong, conscious, honest relationship with oneself. [Opposite value: Avoiding a relationship with oneself; being dissociated.]
Being willing to look at painful or ugly sides of oneself. [Opposite value: Shying away from one’s unhealed sides, which often includes nurturing a delusion of being already healthy.]
Having courage; that is, taking action in spite of one’s own fears. [Opposite value: Living crippled by fear.]
Being willing to admit errors and then struggling to change them. [Opposite value: Always having to be right, or being a compulsive apologizer who never changes negative behavior.]
Exercising one’s ability to view things from different perspectives. [Opposite value: Steadfastly viewing things from one, rigid perspective.]
Taking radical distance from one’s family of origin. [Opposite value: Being unable to evolve beyond one’s family of origin, which signifies remaining an emotional child forever.]
Being financially independent. [Opposite value: Being financially dependent — and lacking a freedom because of it.]
Respecting others’ true selves. [Opposite value: Being a boundary-crosser — and not even knowing it.]
Experimenting, including engaging in healthy risk-taking. [Opposite value: Taking no risks, and always sticking to the tried and true.]
Being confident enough to live in the flux of insecurity. [Opposite value: Being so deeply insecure that one has to surround oneself in the delusion of safety.]
Having strong sexual boundaries. [Opposite value: Acting out sexually, using sex as a vehicle to express one’s unconscious thoughts and feelings; that is, in our modern world, being somewhere on the continuum of sexually normal to extremely sexually perverted.]
Loving nature, wilderness, wildlife, and the non-human natural world. [Opposite value: Having little consideration for nature, the wilderness, wildlife, and the non-human natural world; living an utterly human-centered existence.]
Having broad-ranging intellectual curiosity. [Opposite value: Being intellectually disinterested or limited.]
Making sacrifices to achieve an important goal. [Opposite value: Being unable to make sacrifices to achieve important goals; being stuck.]
Taking a public stand. [Opposite value: Being afraid to be out of the closet, in any sense of the metaphor; living in terror of public rejection.]
Living a healthy physical life, including eating well, keeping appropriately active, and getting a good night’s sleep. [Opposite value: Living an unhealthy physical lifestyle, including eating poorly, exercising too much or too little, and having poor sleeping habits.]
Loving children. [Opposite value: Being disinterested in or bored by children — a clear sign of psychic deadness.]
Recognizing the insanity in people having children before they have healed their own traumas. [Opposite value: Having children or thinking it’s okay to have children before one has healed one’s own child within; in essence, turning a blind eye to the perpetuation of child abuse, which is the root of human destructiveness.]
Having fun. [Opposite value: Being a stick-in-the-mud.]

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